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Tech Leaders Need To Push Trump On These Three Major Issues

By Kish Rajan

In the wake of the presidential election, Silicon Valley is in a deeply awkward position. Almost the entire tech industry backed Hillary Clinton, but Donald Trump is the one who is about to enter the Oval Office.

This may sting but tech leaders can’t just dismiss the new administration. For one thing, the federal government is a giant technology customer. In 2015 Hewlett-Packard, IBM and Dell brought in a combined $14 billion in revenue from government contracts.

The federal government also has the regulatory power to make the lives of tech executives easier or much, much harder. Many fear that we’re in for the latter. Trump has hinted at starting a trade war with China, which is both a cheap manufacturer and a giant customer for tech companies. Clamping down on immigration could stem the tide of bright foreign entrepreneurs who have helped build some of the biggest companies in Silicon Valley. And Trump has called net neutrality a “top-down power grab” so Title II may be reversed.

But there are still places where tech leaders might be able to influence the President-elect and his transition team in order to help the tech industry. Here are three things executives should push for in the upcoming meeting:

Universal Broadband

One of Trump’s biggest selling points was his promise to bring jobs back to the many communities that have been hurt by the slow death of manufacturing in this country. But short of a miracle, he’s not going to be able to bring back manufacturing jobs.

Instead, he should focus on bringing those communities into the modern age with increased access to fast, reliable broadband. By making sure that everyone has access to the internet, he’ll help people advance their education, apply for jobs online and even build new businesses. In this digital age, living without broadband is a serious hardship for anyone who wants to do better for themselves.

By creating incentives for private investment by broadband service providers to expand the footprint of their offerings, speed their networks and reach a point of saturation, the president-elect would go a long way in not only modernizing America, but also creating jobs in the process. The appetite for investment, backed by incentives to increase capex, would send a strong signal to America that communications and tech inclusivity is the path toward prosperity.

Infrastructure Improvement

During the campaign, Trump proposed a $1 trillion infrastructure-improvement plan to put people to work fixing the nation’s highways, bridges, tunnels and airports. Assuming he continues to cite this as a priority for his new administration, the tech industry should push to have a seat at this table. Instead of simply building roads and patching decaying infrastructure, we should build smart roads that have built-in sensors to track everything from traffic to whether a road needs immediate maintenance. Insights from big data can help improve traffic flow and adjust speed limits to ease congestion and increase safety.

And the digital infrastructure that is mostly invisible should be a part of that plan. Consumers favor modern networks that fuel their smartphones and mobile devices, as the reliance on the antiquated landline telephone networks diminishes by record amounts every quarter. By incentivizing private deployment and decreasing barriers to buildout, we also create a digital superhighway that will promote many new businesses not just in California, but in every part of the country. The administration should also champion the idea of “dig once” which would mandate that pipes for fiber optic cables be laid down any time there is a federally-funded highway project. This will eliminate the need for teams to dig and re-dig streets every time wires need to be upgraded, which is costly and inconvenient for drivers. It’s time to revive this dormant policy opportunity.

Develop the Workforce

If this country is going to get serious about creating more jobs, it needs to start at the education level. Too many people are entering the workforce without the skills they need to succeed in the digital age and a rapidly changing economy. Improving our education system by increasing the emphasis on STEM education would be a good start.

But Trump also needs to acknowledge that immigrants are building some of our biggest tech companies, which are also creating jobs. Elon Musk, whose Tesla cars and batteries are made in America, is from South Africa. Google employs 62,000 people in the U.S. alone. That company’s co-founder, Sergey Brin, was born in Russia, and its CEO, Sundar Pichai, was born in India. The startups founded by immigrants should remain U.S.-based. Curtailing immigration is a short-sighted solution, and the hope is that the tech industry can underscore this thought in a powerful way. Comprehensive immigration reform may be off the table, but that doesn’t mean that improvements cannot be made to the current system in order to continue the flow of bright engineers and innovators to the America.

While tech leaders are likely to have many concerns about the new administration, they need to pick their battles. By focusing on these three areas, they can appeal to Trump’s campaign promises, especially around creating new jobs, while helping to maintain the health of the whole tech industry.

Silicon Valley Rejected Trump. How Will The Industry Work With The New Administration?

Steve Westly moves easily between the worlds of technology and politics. The venture capitalist, who was an early investor in Tesla, served as state controller and chief financial officer of California between 2003 and 2007.

Now, like many in Silicon Valley, he is watching cautiously as President-elect Donald Trump forms his cabinet and starts to signal what his priorities will be over the next four years.

Despite Trump’s rhetoric during the campaign, when he railed against immigrants, called climate change a hoax and threatened to start a trade war with China, Westly believes that when it comes down to making real policy, Trump will back down on some of his most damaging rhetoric.

“I think Silicon Valley will fare just fine,” Westly told CALinnovates Chief Evangelist Kish Rajan. “Silicon Valley is getting bigger, not smaller. It is the tech center of the world, and I don’t think Trump wants to slow that growth for any reason.”

Immigrants have proven to be the secret sauce of Silicon Valley helping build companies that have created thousands of jobs. Renewable energy is quickly getting more affordable than coal and natural gas, and almost every economist agrees that a trade war with China would be a disaster.

But that doesn’t mean the Valley should be complacent. The economic dislocation that swept Trump into office is a growing problem.

“The 800-pound gorilla in the room is that new technology is coming,” says Westly. “But we have to get smarter about re-educating the American workforce. We have not done that nearly well enough in the past.”

Listen to the full interview here:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

After The Election: What Is Silicon Valley’s Responsibility?

Silicon Valley is just starting a long conversation about what the technology industry will look post-election. There’s no denying that things like fake new stories and filter bubbles strengthened the digital walls that are dividing the country. But that’s not where the conversation should end.

Over the coming months, we will be using A Step Ahead to explore questions around how much responsibility Silicon Valley should bear and what the industry can do going forward to help unite the country and build a stronger economy for everyone.

“This is a real opportunity for the technology community at large to force correct a little bit,” said CALinnovates founder Mike Montgomery on the latest A Step Ahead podcast. “Silicon Valley needs to fully embrace that the world changed on election night.”

In addition to thinking about social media, the industry will have to reckon with what role hacking may have played in the election and how it might hurt politics going forward. Tech titans will have to think carefully about how technology can help everyone, not just the people who are profiting from venture capital money, and we will all have to continue to talk about the ways in which government can harm or help the tech industry’s growth.

Listen to the full podcast here:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

City Permitting Is Complicated. Technology Can Make It Easier.

When big companies build new office or commercial spaces, they have teams of lawyers and consultants who help them navigate the permitting process.

Small-business owners don’t have that same luxury, and city hall can often be a confusing place.

That’s where OpenCounter comes in. The tech company works with cities to make the permitting process easier and more tech friendly. They take the many rules and regulations a new business owner might need to understand and present them in an intuitive way through their online portal.

It’s an idea that more cities could use to help spur new business. In a conversation with CALinnovates Chief Evangelist Kish Rajan, OpenCounter co-founder Peter Koht pointed out that America is 49th in the world for ease of starting a businesses and 33rd for ease of construction permitting. These complications create real problems for new business owners.

“This is not a problem unique to California,” said Koht. “We need citizen-focused permitting.”

Koht and his co-founder, Joel Mahoney, approached the problem from a design point of view. The information that new businesses need is mostly already on a city’s website. OpenCounter uses algorithms and natural language to present that information in a way that more people can easily use.

Listen to the full interview below:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

Just Like Olivia Pope, But Without The White Dress And Affairs: Justin Knighten Helps Folks Maneuver Sacramento

The world of Sacramento is its own ecosystem. Beyond politicians and lobbyists, there are people like Justin Knighten, vice president at Lucas Public Affairs, who work with businesses and interest groups to navigate the sometimes tricky paths to influencing policy.

“Think of us as Olivia Pope [from Scandal] but without the white dress and affairs,” Knighten joked to CALInnovates Chief Evangelist Kish Rajan during a wide-ranging interview.

Businesses, especially tech companies, are getting more involved in policy in California, and they’re signaling to the next generation that this is just part of doing business — especially for tech companies that are looking to disrupt industries. Inevitably, those disruptors are going to want to be heard on policy decisions, and that’s where Knighten comes in.

He’s helping companies understand that their reputations, which play an important role in how they are welcomed in Sacramento, are not forged by accident. It’s an ongoing thing, and businesses have to be aware of who their audiences are and what they’re saying to them.

Government has to be aware of its audience as well, and as a millennial, Knighten would like to see government reaching out more to younger people and making itself more relevant to digital natives.

“As young people think about what they want their impact on the world to be, I’m a big advocate for going into government,” said Knighten. “It’s a great platform.”

Listen to the full interview here:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

 

 

Graham Richard Is Bringing Business And Government Together To Encourage Clean Energy

There’s enormous potential in clean energy. Not only will it finally wean us off of harmful fossil fuels, but it will create an entire new industry with lots of new jobs.

But in order to make this vision of the future a reality, businesses and government need to work together. That’s where Graham Richard comes in.

The former mayor of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, Richard is now chief executive of Advanced Energy Economy, a San Francisco-based advocacy firm that is working to bring about a “prosperous economy based on secure, clean, affordable energy.” Richard works with companies such as Apple and Facebook that want to purchase more clean energy. He also works with federal and local governments to put policies in place that encourage the growth of the clean-energy sector.

“I’m more optimistic today than I have ever been,” Richard told CALInnovates Chief Evangelist Kish Rajan during an interview for the podcast “A Step Ahead.” “Because of innovative forces, the job-generating and economic impacts are becoming more effectively understood.”

Richard understands that in order to bring about a truly robust renewable economy, we need more than clever entrepreneurs coming up with great ideas like Nest and Tesla. We need the government to make fundamental changes in the way utilities are built and regulated. Instead of siloed regulations that look at things like the energy grid and renewables as different beasts, we need system-wide regulation that can bring lots of different players to the same table.

“Innovation in environmental technology is creating a $200 billion market,” says Richard. “That could climb to a $1 trillion market by 2030 and create new jobs all across the country.” If everyone comes together to make it happen.

Listen to the full interview below:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

Kyra Worthy Is Helping The City Of Richmond Help Itself

As the executive director at For Richmond, Kyra Worthy is a tireless advocate for the people of Richmond, a working-class community located north of Berkeley and just across the San Francisco Bay from tony Mill Valley.

Worthy’s job is to help the people of Richmond live up to their full potential through better education and better jobs. She helps students and parents navigate the tricky waters of education beyond high school by working with historically black colleges to send promising students to college summer programs and then to four-year programs. She makes sure that when companies promise jobs for the community, they deliver, and that residents are prepared to fill those jobs.

For Richmond helps lots of people, but Worthy says there is still more work to be done.

“To have this negative cloud over the city as if folks aren’t ready [to work] is really doing an injustice for folks who just sort of skip over Richmond,” says Worthy. “People try to make the answers for the community instead of engaging the community.” She’s working to turn that around.

Listen to “A Step Ahead”‘s full interview with Worthy below:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

Technology Can Help Heal This Divided Country

By Mike Montgomery

On Tuesday night, America was hit with an earthquake. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a Democrat or a Republican. What Tuesday showed is that we are a country that is even more deeply divided than many of us thought.

At the heart of that division is a schism between the haves and the have nots. People who feel they have been left behind by the government and the economy may not have been heard by pollsters but they made themselves heard loud and clear Tuesday when they voted for radical change at the top level of government.

While it may be an uncomfortable situation, those of us in the tech space need to talk about the role technology played in that divide.

Those of us living in the iPhone bubble may believe that things like online banking, video calls and streaming music are part of the everyday life of all Americans but that’s not true. We still live in a country that has a very real digital divide.

Studies from the Pew Research Center show that people who earn less money and are less educated also have less access to the internet. While 88% of adults earning more than $150,000 per year have broadband at home, only 45% of those earning under $30,000 a year have the same access. Ninety percent of people at the top income level have smartphones compared to 53% of those at the bottom.

As more and more of the services that people rely on move online, those at the bottom are truly being left behind. They have less access to things like employment websites, online education and new banking options. Without fast access to the internet they are increasingly isolated.

Then there’s the very real problem of job displacement. While technology has made many things easier in our lives, it’s also made a lot of jobs redundant. By 2020 robots will have replaced an estimated 5 million jobs, according to the World Economic Forum. Those people who feel that the jobs they once relied on are deserting their communities — they’re right.

But here’s the thing. I also believe that technology can help solve these problems. Knowing the benefits that come from more people having access to the internet we can put policies in place to close the digital divide. We need policies that encourage states to upgrade their infrastructures to bring broadband to everyone.

We need to accept the reality that the economy, and with it the future of work, is changing fundamentally and it’s not changing back. We can’t pretend that we’re headed for a resurgence of reliable factory jobs.

Instead, let’s enact policies that train people for the jobs of the future. Let’s have a minimum wage so that those in the growing service industry earn enough to take care of their families. And let’s seriously consider things like wage insurance so that when people move into jobs that have less consistent income, they can still count on steady earnings.

But let’s also make sure that at a state level, we don’t overcorrect and put so many regulations in place that we chill new businesses. If the economy is going to grow, we need to encourage our tech entrepreneurs to continue to come up with new ideas that are going to drive the economy of the future.

These ideas are not liberal or conservative, they’re common sense. They are ideas that people on both sides of the aisle can, and should, come together to support.

With the election behind us, it’s time for both sides to work together to heal the problems we saw so nakedly exposed on Tuesday night. Our future depends on it.

The 3 Words Shaking The Tech Sector: President Donald Trump

Donald Trump’s election to the U.S. presidency was a political earthquake that leaves the structural integrity of Silicon Valley’s economy in question.

“It’s the dawn of America that I think everyone is trying to put their finger on,” CALinnovates Executive Director Mike Montgomery told Chief Evangelist Kish Rajan on a special post-election episode of their podcast, “A Step Ahead.”

Right now, it’s hard to say what a Trump presidency portends for innovation, technology and public policy. Whereas Clinton had a detailed section in her policy platform dedicated to technology and innovation policy, Trump’s campaign hasn’t offered such guidance.

One thing we have some insight into, however, is Trump’s stance on immigration, which Montgomery says could have grave implications for talent acquisition, entrepreneurism and economic growth in California. For example, the H-1B visa program brings in a large portion of the talented coders who keep Silicon Valley humming. If he restricts skilled visas to make jobs available to Americans, that could hinder growth at high-tech companies. And the lack of a robust talent pipeline, already a concern for the tech sector, could become even more dire if the state’s top universities no longer matriculate STEM students from foreign countries.

If the new administration doesn’t show a commitment to creating conditions that appeal to businesses here in the U.S., might we see a tech drain out of the U.S.? “I certainly hope not,” says Rajan. “But I think it’s something that we have to think about.”

Listen to the full interview below:

Like what you hear? Subscribe to A Step Ahead on iTunes.

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